YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

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YINJISPACE use media professional’s unique perspective,try to explore the essence of life behind the design works.

© logo 粤ICP备19077098号
Mexican

Taller Hector Barroso

Taller Hector Barroso is an architecture studio in Mexico, named after its founder, Hector Barroso Riba, who founded it in 2008. Taller Hector Barroso's project has a "quiet in the woods" mood, which conforms to the environment of the site, welcomes the beautiful natural landscape and lives in harmony with nature.

Hector Barroso graduated from Universidad Anahuac Mexico in 1982. Since graduation, he has been engaged in the design industry for 38 years. In 2017, his work won the AZ award for best residential architecture in Canada. In the same year, he won the gold medal of young architects in the Mexico biennale. In 2019, he won the 9th IDEA TOPS award for best residential architecture.

Taller Hector Barroso is committed to using the natural resources of each place to stand out, such as the surrounding vegetation, the composition of the soil, the geographical location and so on, to create a building scheme that integrates with the environment. They insist on creating unique works in the natural environment.

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    Design Works

    • House in Avandaro

      The house was designed by Mexico City studio Taller Hector Barroso as a weekend retreat for a family of six. Architecture studio Taller Hector Barroso has used earthen blocks, pine and concrete to help this holiday dwelling blend into its forested setting in central Mexico. A primary goal for the design team was to create an "architecture that belongs to the place and merges with its surrounding forest".
    • LC 710

      Architecture firm Taller Hector Barroso has designed a housing complex in Mexico City, with warm-hued concrete walls inside and out. The four-storey LC710 housing project is situated in a residential part of Colonia del Valle. Measuring 10,333 square feet (960 square metres), the complex comprises six residential units, with various floor plans but similar characteristics.
    • Entrepinos House

      In a vast forest area in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, five weekend houses are dispersed along the ground, adapting to the site′s topography; surrounded by pine trees that echo the sound of the wind. The materials are from the region: brick, wood and soil. The soil, taken and reused from the excavations to bury the foundations is the main material. All the walls are covered with it. Thereby, architecture emerges from the place.
    • Sierra Mimbres

      Taller Hector Barroso's project has a "quiet in the woods" mood, which conforms to the environment of the site, welcomes the beautiful natural landscape and lives in harmony with nature. Taller Hector Barroso is committed to using the natural resources of each place to stand out, such as the surrounding vegetation, the composition of the soil, the geographical location and so on, to create a building scheme that integrates with the environment. They insist on creating unique works in the natural environment.
    • Tucan House

      Tucan House sits on top of a hill of Valle de Bravo, on a rectangular plot with a narrow front and a generous depth. The land has an upward slope of fourteen meters from the entrance to the highest point of the property. Taking advantage of the topography, the project was developed through a sequence of stepped sections generating pavilions at various levels and maximizing views of the lake. The house is connected to the context and becomes part of the landscape allowing the contemplation of its surroundings. Wind, natural light, nature and its sounds take command and form an integral part of the house.
    • Lorena Saravia

      Located on Masaryk Avenue in Mexico City, the project is inspired by the elegance, simplicity and geometric purity that define Mexican designer Lorena Saravia. In the window as in the interior space, raw materials are used: steel, concrete and wood. The idea behind your choice is to let the clothes be the protagonist by choosing a range of stony colors and textures that contrast with the lightness of the garments.